Spring: Nothing Is So Beautiful

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G. D. Williams © 2017

In the opening verses of Gerard Manley Hopkins’ poem SPRING:

 

Nothing is so beautiful as Spring –

When weeds, in wheels, shoot long and lovely and lush;

Thrush’s eggs look like little low heavens, and thrush

Through the echoing timber does so rinse and wring

The ear, it strikes like lightnings to hear him sing;

The glassy peartree leaves and blooms, they brush

The descending blue; that blue is all in a rush

With richness; the racing lambs too have fair their fling.

 

Kate Kellaway in The Guardian wrote

“If there is anything more beautiful, it is this poem. It has a heightened, rapturous and intoxicated quality: “The glassy pear tree leaves and blooms, they brush / the descending blue; that blue is all in a rush / with richness; the racing lambs too have fair their fling.” On a spring morning it is a poem one can recite that makes spring seem more intensely itself: even the lambs have been partying, and how that hallucinogenic “glassy” carries the line forward, unexpectedly filling it with light.”

Photograph: EPA/Alamy
Photograph: EPA/Alamy

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2014/mar/21/the-10-best-poems-about-spring

The full poem is below as well as links to Gerard Manley Hopkins’ biographical information.  In my old book POETRY OF THE VICTORIAN PEROID by Professor George Benjamin Woods 1930 the poetry of Gerald Manley Hopkins is described this way:

“The poems of Hopkins were first published, from manuscript sources, by Robert Bridges in 1918.  Hopkins is often obscure in phrasing and peculiar in style and rhythm.  His poems show oddity and originality.”

 

Hopkins brings Spring to life in this poem.  After a long bitter Winter, Spring is a welcomed friend whom you invite inside for a cup of tea and a few scones or, across the pond, a cup of coffee and a muffin.

There is nothing as refreshing as to to rise each morning and peer out the window as the grass greens and the leaves bud.  Opening the window, the cool breezes and the melodies of the tree songsters fill the ambiance.

And if one ventures outside in the cool morning, the dew is still heavy on the growing daffodils. The rose bushes glisten as the sun’s rays touch the dew drops.

Of course there is nothing like the rains of Spring.  One can sit in the hay loft and listen to the rhythm of the rain drops on the old tin roof.

Venturing out to the flower meadows, one can lay watching the clouds above or watching a bumblebee uniting with the flower to cover its legs in pollen. This demonstrates a perfect harmony of creation between bee and flower since they both need each other to survive.

There are a thousand things to enjoy about Spring.  Choose the ones you appreciate and embrace them to the hilt.

For Spring is the perfect transition from Winter to Summer.  Spring is truly an ode to joy.

G. D. Williams © 2017

POST 709

G. D. Williams © 2017
G. D. Williams © 2017

SPRING

Nothing is so beautiful as Spring –

When weeds, in wheels, shoot long and lovely and lush;

Thrush’s eggs look little low heavens, and thrush

Through the echoing timber does so rinse and wring

The ear, it strikes like lightnings to hear him sing;

The glassy peartree leaves and blooms, they brush

The descending blue; that blue is all in a rush

With richness; the racing lambs too have fair their fling.

 

What is all this juice and all this joy?

A strain of the earth’s sweet being in the beginning

In Eden garden. – Have, get, before it cloy,

Before it cloud, Christ, lord, and sour with sinning,

Innocent mind and Mayday in girl and boy,

Most, O maid’s child, thy choice and worthy the winning.

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/51002

 

Gerard Manley Hopkins  July 28, 1844, Stratford, Essex, Eng.—died June 8, 1889, Dublin

http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/hopkins/hopkins12.html

https://www.lrb.co.uk/v36/n07/helen-vendler/i-have-not-lived-up-to-it

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2009/05/11/back-to-basics-2

“For Gerard Manley Hopkins, however, the divine calling came not in a dream in a stable but from an article in the Times of London—the first of many signs that the modern poet’s vision would be more ambiguous, and much less happy, than that of the medieval scop. On December 8, 1875, Hopkins read the newspaper’s account of a shipwreck off the coast of Kent. The Deutschland, a steamer carrying emigrants from Bremen to New York, had run aground in a storm, and more than fifty of its passengers and crew were drowned. Hopkins, who was in Wales studying theology as part of his nine-year training to become a Jesuit priest, was especially struck by the detail that five of the dead were Franciscan nuns—exiles from imperial Germany, where Bismarck was prosecuting his Kulturkampf against the Catholic Church.”

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Gerard-Manley-Hopkins

 

VIVALDI – Spring from The Four Seasons

 

 

 

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