The Passing of the Song

There was a time when the oceans were pristine.  Life teemed in exorbitant beauty and variety.

However, humans were not content fishing alongside their coastal villages.  They built simple vessels to venture out from the shore, mainly to hunt.

Exploration was a secondary result.  Bigger and sturdier ships were built.

Fishing became a business to feed the growing numbers of humans as they spread across the plains and valleys of earth.  Food was the first necessity, but as the centuries rolled on, the needs for “modern” living became the impetus for the great whaling ships as they hunted the giants of the deep.

Whale oil became the essential element.  From lighting the night lamps to making soap or margarine, whale oil was the thing to have.

Whales were hunted to the verge of extinction.  Changing habits and discoveries saved the mighty ones from the barbaric spears and nets of humans.

Perhaps, the most classic tale of the hunt was Moby Dick. This 1851 novel from Herman Melville painted a grim picture of an obsessed Captain and his reckless pursuit of a great white whale.

In the end of this tale of the sea all human life is lost except for one survivor who lived to tell the story.  Perhaps this story was meant to convey something of the incessant hunt of the whales or the futility of human existence.

Land creatures who venture onto the oceans are intruders into a vast array of life separated from land.  Unfortunately, for the teeming species of life in earth’s oceans and seas, the human touch has tainted the song, the song of whales and all life— beautiful and mysterious beings of the deep.

The land dwellers are ever increasing as natural resources are consumed faster than the statistical analysis of their impending demise.  Unfortunately, as many land dwellers feast on the ocean’s bounty and drink the wine of human progress, millions of men, women and children do not share in this cornucopia.

The tragedy of the oceans is reflected on these faces who struggle for a morsel of grain and a taste of clean water.  The world is dying under the mantle of human progress.

Perhaps, the words from a 1971 song describe what the fate will be. The Whale Song:

Song of the whale so sweet and so clear
But no song at all to the ones who won’t hear
And if people don’t listen, and if people don’t know
Might the song of the man be the next song to go.

Whale song continue to sing
There’s a place in this world for each living thing
So long, but just for today
‘Cause people will listen and I know there’s a way.

The full text of the song is below.  Ecology is not a governmental problem.  It’s a human problem which continues to plague this world.

What will the next generation face?  And the generation after them?

G. D. Williams © 2014

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The Whale Song

Whale song, soft and low
Sing a story as gently you go
Whale song, I hear what you say
This may be the last time you’re passing this way.

Sing me a song of times that you knew
When the waters were clear and the seabirds they flew
Through a sky that was clear from the sea to the land
Safe from the fear and destruction of man.

Whale song, soft and low
Sing a story as gently you go
Whale song, I hear what you say
This may be the last time you’re passing this way.

Song of the whale so sweet and so clear
But no song at all to the ones who won’t hear
And if people don’t listen, and if people don’t know
Might the song of the man be the next song to go.

Whale song continue to sing
There’s a place in this world for each living thing
So long, but just for today
‘Cause people will listen and I know there’s a way.

Read more: The Partridge Family – Whale Song Lyrics | MetroLyrics

G. D. Williams  © 2014

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References:

Whatever Happened To Moby Dick?

http://www.shirleyjones.net/Whale.html

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0670214/

Whale World

Whale Facts and Information

Whale Chart
O. A. R. Northwest
http://oarnorthwest.com/2013/03/daily-education-update-3-6-whales/

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