January 17, 1961: A Weary President’s Farewell To The Nation

On a winter evening in 1961 the 34th President of the United States, Dwight David Eisenhower, delivered his farewell to a nation waiting to usher in a new and very young President on Friday.  What he said in that speech still reverberates today in September 2012.

Here are some lifted sections:

We now stand ten years past the midpoint of a century that has witnessed four major wars among great nations. Three of these involved our own country. Despite these holocausts America is today the strongest, the most influential and most productive nation in the world. Understandably proud of this pre-eminence, we yet realize that America’s leadership and prestige depend, not merely upon our unmatched material progress, riches and military strength, but on how we use our power in the interests of world peace and human betterment.

Throughout America’s adventure in free government, such basic purposes have been to keep the peace; to foster progress in human achievement, and to enhance liberty, dignity and integrity among peoples and among nations.

To strive for less would be unworthy of a free and religious people.

We face a hostile ideology global in scope, atheistic in character, ruthless in purpose, and insidious in method. Unhappily the danger it poses promises to be of indefinite duration. To meet it successfully, there is called for, not so much the emotional and transitory sacrifices of crisis, but rather those which enable us to carry forward steadily, surely, and without complaint the burdens of a prolonged and complex struggle – with liberty the stake. Only thus shall we remain, despite every provocation, on our charted course toward permanent peace and human betterment.

As we peer into society’s future, we – you and I, and our government – must avoid the impulse to live only for today, plundering for, for our own ease and convenience, the precious resources of tomorrow. We cannot mortgage the material assets of our grandchildren without asking the loss also of their political and spiritual heritage. We want democracy to survive for all generations to come, not to become the insolvent phantom of tomorrow.

Crises there will continue to be. In meeting them, whether foreign or domestic, great or small, there is a recurring temptation to feel that some spectacular and costly action could become the miraculous solution to all current difficulties. A huge increase in the newer elements of our defenses; development of unrealistic programs to cure every ill in agriculture; a dramatic expansion in basic and applied research – these and many other possibilities, each possibly promising in itself, may be suggested as the only way to the road we wish to travel.

Down the long lane of the history yet to be written America knows that this world of ours, ever growing smaller, must avoid becoming a community of dreadful fear and hate, and be, instead, a proud confederation of mutual trust and respect.

You and I – my fellow citizens – need to be strong in our faith that all nations, under God, will reach the goal of peace with justice. May we be ever unswerving in devotion to principle, confident but humble with power, diligent in pursuit of the Nations’ great goals.

To all the peoples of the world, I once more give expression to America’s prayerful and continuing aspiration:

We pray that peoples of all faiths, all races, all nations, may have their great human needs satisfied; that those now denied opportunity shall come to enjoy it to the full; that all who yearn for freedom may experience its spiritual blessings; that those who have freedom will understand, also, its heavy responsibilities; that all who are insensitive to the needs of others will learn charity; that the scourges of poverty, disease and ignorance will be made to disappear from the earth, and that, in the goodness of time, all peoples will come to live together in a peace guaranteed by the binding force of mutual respect and love.

REFLECTIONS:

President Eisenhower was 70 years old at the time of this speech.  He had served his country for over 50 years.

He believed that every American should be treated equally.  He brought about the desegregation of the military and used troops to enforce federal rulings on integration in the school system.

Plagued by health problems he succumbed to the human eventuality on March 28, 1969.  He and his beloved wife, Mamie, are buried together on the grounds of his Presidential Library in Abilene, Kansas.

Upon his death, the newly elected President Richard Nixon, who had served as Eisenhower’s Vice-President said, “Some men are considered great because they lead great armies or they lead powerful nations. For eight years now, Dwight Eisenhower has neither commanded an army nor led a nation; and yet he remained through his final days the world’s most admired and respected man, truly the first citizen of the world.”

The first citizen of the world walked his road of life until its final conclusion.  He lived life and affected the course of history on this planet traversing the cosmos.

I will close this post with a section from a speech given April 16, 1953 by President Eisenhower:

Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children.” Chance For Peace

G. D. Williams       © 2012

Post 391

References:

http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=90&page=transcript

http://www.eisenhower.archives.gov/

http://www.public.navy.mil/airfor/cvn69/Pages/Ship%27sNamesake.aspx

http://www.edchange.org/multicultural/speeches/ike_chance_for_peace.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWiIYW_fBfY

Advertisements